Tuesday, December 4, 2018

The importance of veterinary care for cats and why they're not getting it

Do owners take their cats to the veterinarian less often than their dogs?

A few weeks ago, I took Bear Cat to the veterinarian for his yearly wellness visit and vaccinations. What struck me while there was that he was the only cat there! I can't remember the last time we saw another cat at the office; it's been YEARS!!! With my scientific background, I understand there could be a variety of reasons: people are taking cats to cat only veterinarians, the veterinarian tries to schedule cats at the same time and I called to request a certain day and specific time, I'm not in sync with other cat people who tend toward specific times of the week or day, our veterinarian's doggy daycare business is booming ... or the explanation that I fear. People just aren't taking their cats to the veterinarian as much as they are dogs.



I've seen various statistics on this - indicating people take cats to the veterinarian far less often than dogs. And to be honest, I understand not wanting to deal with the hassle to some extent. I dread taking my cats to the veterinarian. I hate shoving a cat in the carrier and trying to be sneaky about it. I hate that quite often, by the time I get the cat secured in the carrier, I'm out of breath and in need of a nap and a stiff drink. I dread the car ride with a very unhappy cat meowing the whole way. Not to mention the horrible feeling of betrayal I feel from the cat's reaction. I feel horrible when I see how scared my cats are when they're in the veterinarian's office. Any one of those reasons is enough to make those who share their lives with cats take pause. Err ... paws [sorry, couldn't resist].



So are people really not taking their cats to the veterinarian as often as they do dogs? An informal poll suggests that there might be something to my fears - though many of the people I asked reported that they see cats all the time when they take their cats in. But before we move on, let's be clear as to the question we're trying to answer. Are we asking if cats are being taken to the veterinarian at all? Or are we asking if the average dog is taken to the veterinarian more often than the average cat? The answer to one question might not equal the answer to the other. So I want to be clear that this discussion is relational. It's not whether cats are being taken at all - but why they might be taken less often than dogs in the same family. 




Breaking down the numbers.

If you look at the disparity in veterinarian visits and average cost of those visits - you'll see that dogs ARE taken to the veterinarian more often and, on average, more money is spent on their medical care. 

Data from the U.S. Pet Ownership Statistics from 2012 U.S. Pet Ownership & Demographics Sourcebook:  

  • The average number of cats per household is 2.1 
  • The average number of dogs per household is 1.6. 
  • But the average number of household vet visits show that those 2.1 cats are only taken to the vet 1.6 times a year. That means people aren't taking all their cats once a year. 
  • The average number of household vet visits for dogs is 2.6.
  • The yearly mean veterinary expenditure per dog is $227. The yearly mean veterinary expenditure per cat is $90.

Using those numbers:

  • FOR CATS: 1.6 [yearly vet visits per household for cats]/2.1 [the average number of cats in each household] = 0.7619 [yearly vet visits for each cat]. That means the average cost per visit for cats = 90 [yearly mean vet expense per cat]/.7619 [yearly vet visits for each cat] = $118.13.
  • FOR DOGS: 2.6 [yearly vet visits per household for dogs]/1.6 [the average number of dogs in each household] = 1.625 [yearly vet visits for each dog]. That means the average cost per visit for dogs = 227 [yearly mean vet expense per dog]/1.625 [yearly vet visits for each dog] = $139.69.

Yes. That means dogs are taken to the veterinarian an average of 1.625 times a year - and cats only .7619 times. Dogs are taken to the veterinarian twice as often as cats are! In regard to cost, the second set of calculations indicate that the higher yearly mean expenditure per dog is not simply due to higher costs for dogs. In fact, the average dog visit [$139.69] costs more than the average cat visit [$118.13] - but not enough to account for the $137 disparity in expenditures on veterinary care for dogs vs. cats per year. To read more about the issue and disparity in treatment between the species, Julie McAlee of Cats Herd You wrote an excellent post, Why Cats Visit the Vet Less Often than Dogs about the extent of the problem.



So let's speculate for a minute WHY people would not want to take their cats to the veterinarian. I already shared why I dread taking my cats to the veterinarian. To be honest, taking my cats in is one of the things I wait until the last minute on. I'm not proud of that - but the discomfort and unpleasantness of taking my cats does alter my behavior to a certain extent. I've always been lucky enough to have the resources to take my cats when they need it - but economics might be another reason people aren't taking their cats to the veterinarian. Dawn White from Lola The Rescued Cat just posted on Helping Pet Parents Avoid Economic Euthanasia. Economics are certainly an issue for some. Then again, they seem to take their dogs on a regular basis. Are dogs more valued in our society? Go to any pet store and you'll find the dog section is bigger than all the other sections (cats, fish, reptiles, rodents, etc) put together. Of course, they count on people bringing their dogs and hope for impulse buys with the dog's help. Are dogs more valued and held in higher esteem or is there something else going on? How do our perceptions of each species change how we treat them? Many people still believe the old wisdom that cats are self-sufficient and thus they require little from us. In fact, a recent study cited on Veterinary Practice News, 81% of people believe cats are self-sufficient. Is this mistaken belief why cats aren't being taken to the veterinarian as often as dogs? And when you don't really think about it, I suppose you can convince yourself that not taking one's cats makes sense. But really, what about cats makes people think that they'll survive with little care at all? Or that they don't suffer the same illnesses as humans and dogs do?




Cats get sick too.

I can't tell you how many times I've been in a waiting room or area and I've had a conversation with someone who honestly doesn't know that cats get many of the same diseases we do. I've seen many shocked faces when I've talked about dental problems or cancer in cats: "They get that?" I believe part of the issue is in education. Not only do people think cats are self-sufficient, but they also lack the education to know how best to care for their cats. There's no formal training - no group for support like in obedience training. To a certain extent, each new cat person learns as they go on - with little information about the best way to go about it. And our cats suffer for it. What should we teach people? Cats get many of the same diseases we do? Prevention is key? What's certain is that being an indoor-only cat DOES NOT avoid disease. If you wait until a cat shows symptoms of not feeling good - it's often too late. Cats are masters at disguising their symptoms. A quick story - all of a sudden my cat, Kitty, couldn't stop vomiting. First thing the veterinarian noticed was that one of her fangs was seriously inflamed and the tooth needed to be extracted. I felt like such a horrible pet parent that it had gotten to that point - but cats are known for their ability to appear fine. Years later, by the time I realized she was hiding, it was too late and the veterinarian said there was nothing they could do. She was always a bit reclusive ... and a day or two can go by quickly without even thinking the cat is sick. I spoke about educating new owners - and Kitty is the perfect example. She was my family's first cat and there were so many things we just didn't know. In the end, she suffered for it and that weighs heavily on my conscience. I didn't know about cats hiding disease - or dental issues in cats - or how easily it is to develop hepatic lipidosis when the cat stops eating. I believe we can spare many of these first time owner mistakes just by taking the time to educate new owners on how to have healthy cats.



I believe educating people on the diseases and health problems cats get might be the first step toward a more cat-health-friendly society; I honestly believe many people just don't know and don't think about it. So, quickly, let's get specific about the problems cats often present with. I highly suggest you don't stop at the links included below - but look up and read about these conditions from other sources so you know what to look for. The earlier most illnesses are treated, the better the outcome. As you'll see in the links below, I highly recommend Cornell Feline Health Center for information on Feline Health Topics. A close second in terms of quality education is the AVMA or American Veterinary Medical Association. The best way to be a good cat owner is to arm one's self with information and education about best practices.

*** Parasites *** 
This is true even for indoor cats. Indoor cats are not immune to parasites - especially those carried in by other members of the household. Beyond fleas and ticks, worms (tapeworms, roundworms, hookworms, and heartworms) also take a toll on a cat if not treated adequately soon enough. When we adopted Ellie she had bloody diarrhea - an obvious problem. But when she tested positive again a year later - she wasn't having any obvious symptoms and we were shocked because she hadn't had symptoms for months. To read about our experience with worms, you can read Let's talk about ... WORMS?!? #ChewyInfluencer. For more information on problems with parasites: Gastrointestinal Parasites of Cats and Fleas: A Source of Torment for your Cat.



*** Dental issues ***
Tooth resorption is a common problem in cats. Bear in particular has struggled with losing his teeth to this process. His first extraction was when he was two and he's had several more dentals each with extractions. Anecdotally, it seems that by the time a cat reaches nine or ten, the owner finds the vet saying the cat needs an extraction. Time and time again, the person I'm speaking with is shocked. My father is a great example. He grew up on a farm - with lots of cats - and it took a lot of information to convince him that a cat's dental issues wouldn't just resolve themselves. The biggest difference between the farm cats and the cats we have today are lifestyle. Farm cats are always outdoor - which means they often don't live long enough to experience problems. It's also true that many farm cats are fed human scraps - instead of food specially formulated to provide for all of a cat's nutritional needs. We wrote a post about dental awareness awhile ago ... you may read it here: Watch Out For The Teeth! To read more about the dental diseases cats get: Feline Dental Disease.



*** Kidney disease ***
Kidney diseases are common - especially in older cats - and can take a toll on a cat'a quality of life. I actually had no idea that kidney issues are widespread among cats. It wasn't until I started blogging and meeting all kinds of cats from all over, that I heard about many of the cats I loved the most suffering and in the end dying from kidney issues. To read more about the most common kidney issue in cats ... Chronic Kidney Disease.

*** Cancer ***
Feline injection site sarcomas always top my list of things to worry about - but is relatively rare. Then again, when your cat is the one out of a thousand affected, it doesn't provide any comfort to find out it's rare. And these types of sarcomas tend to grow back and can be aggressive. To read about our sarcoma-scare: Too Close to a Nightmare I Couldn't HandleTo read more about cancer in cats ... Vaccines and Sarcomas: A Concern for Cat OwnersSquamous Cell Cancer: Dangerous, and Lymphoma.



*** Infections of the urinary or respiratory tract ***
These types of infections are common reasons cats are taken to the vet. One thing I've learned of a practical nature ... a cat peeing outside of the litter box should be checked immediately for a UTI. For more information on urinary or respiratory issues: Feline Lower Urinary Tract Disease and Respiratory Infections.

*** Obesity ***
Both my cats are on the heavy-side. I believe that's due to free-feeding where they always have a bowl of food available to them. Being bored all day long, with nothing to do but eat ... I'd be obese too. Diabetes is related to this. Kitty had diabetes and while she lived many years with it, there were times when I wasn't sure I could handle and treat the complications. To read more about these issues, please read Obesity and Feline Diabetes.



*** Vomiting and/or Diarrhea ***

These aren't illnesses by themselves - though they could be life threatening in and of themselves - but symptoms of an underlying issue. The underlying issue could be something as relatively benign as a hair ball the feline is struggling to rid himself of - or much more serious like in the case of pancreatitis. Cats dehydrate easily and so any case of these symptoms for any extended amount of time is an emergency. Bear Cat gave me a scare years ago when he wouldn't stop vomiting over a 24 hour period. I took him to our vet and she checked him over, took x-rays to see if he'd swallowed anything, and gave him fluids - which he quickly threw up at home until all that was left for him to vomit was bile. So a trip to the emergency vet was in order and they kept him overnight on fluids. To read more on these issues: VomitingDiarrheaFeline Pancreatitis: Serious and Pancreatitis.


Other veterinary care-related issues.

While not a health issue itself, vaccinations are also an integral part of keeping your cat healthy. Many municipalities require rabies shots - but there are so many more vaccines available. Because of the injection site sarcomas, vets are especially wary about unnecessary vaccinations and have found ways to do more with less. Speak with your vet - and don't second guess his or her advice. In the end, the relationship between owner and vet is the cat's best protection against illness. Making sure you see the vet on a regular basis fosters that relationship and gives the vet the information and tools he needs to best care for your cat.



Spay and neuter. And DO NOT declaw your cat. Spaying and neutering decreases the risk of certain cancers and also helps eliminate many behavioral issues that often end with the cat being surrendered to a shelter. As much as I want every cat to be adopted from every shelter, if your furniture is more important to you than your cat's well-being, you might just best leave them at the shelter. I've sensed a trend though I don't have numbers to support it. Cats who are valued so little as to be declawed aren't valued enough to keep - especially when they become inconvenient. Declawed cats are surrendered maybe more often that cats with claws. What does that tell you? The owner felt his furniture was more important than a cat being a cat. Doesn't it make sense that someone who cares so little for a cat that he has her declawed would also be the first to get rid of her at the slightest behavioral problem? Declawing has been associated with a wide variety of medical and behavioral issues. You wouldn't de-teeth your cat if he couldn't stop biting, would you? Scratching in cats is instinctual - they aren't being bad - they're being cats! To read more about instincts in cats, please see Feline instinctsI've written a heart-felt post about my family's experience when Kitty was declawed. To read that post: My paws have claws. City the Kitty is another amazing source of information on the horrors of declawing.




How often should I take my cat to the vet?

Most sources of veterinary information say you should take your cat to the vet one or two times a year - in addition to when they are having symptoms. This isn't true of kittens - which require more regular monitoring and vaccinations. Older cats might also require more frequent visits. Bear Cat is almost thirteen. I take him for a yearly wellness visit, blood screen, vaccinations, and fecal evaluation. In practice, he usually goes at least one more time a year when the need arises - so in effect, he sees the vet at least twice a year. Ellie is now considered a senior (when cats are seven) and I take her just as often as Bear. For older cats, yearly blood screens are an easy way to detect problems before they get to a life-threatening point.




Last thoughts to consider.

Cats suffer illnesses just as much as any other living being. Just because you don't see the struggle, doesn't mean it's not there. With both my cats' dental issues, I had no idea the problem was bad enough to affect how much they ate - and Kitty developed a secondary issue of hepatic lipidosis that we struggled with for the remaining six years of her life. If only I'd taken her to the vet a couple months earlier to look into why she wasn't eating much. That's one other message I want to get across. Often one issue leads to another which leads to another. Kitty's inflamed fang and her unwillingness to eat caused hepatic lipidosis. The treatment for lipidosis is prednisone ... which has the inconvenient side effect of increasing blood sugar. A year after Kitty started taking prednisone, she was diagnosed with diabetes due to high blood sugar. Hepatic lipidosis and diabetes are at odds and it was a fine line we had to walk to keep both under control. And it wasn't until our new vet (after a move) decided her hepatic lipidosis shouldn't be chronic that she was put on a supplement that threw our delicate out the window and led to her death. Is that the vet's fault? No. I was lucky to get 15 - almost 16 years with Kitty. She was taken to the vet each year and when it became obvious she was struggling. Without veterinary help, she wouldn't have survived the inflamed fang. Vets save lives every day - all three of my cats are a testament to that. I'm grateful that not only has veterinary care extended their lives - but it's also increased the quality of life for the cats I love more than anything.







In addition to the links above, I also used the following sources of information to write this post:
The Top 10 Most Common Health Problems For Cats and 5 Most Common Health Problems In Cats.

*** IMPORTANT NOTE ***
I am not a vet - nor do I have any veterinary knowledge or education beyond what I've been though with my own cats. As such, I have included many sources of information from sources outside myself. I can't swear by them, though I believe them to be true. I highly recommend establishing a relationship with a vet in your area to ensure your cat gets the proper and adequate care he deserves - you might just find that the lasting relationship you procure with the vet could save your cat's life at some point.

44 comments:

  1. None of us like it but it sure is important and that was a terrific bunch of good info!

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  2. We love this post--well done! We totally agree with everything you've said. We take our younger cats in annually (more if something comes up) and the older ones twice per year. I can say from experience that you are much more likely to catch something in an earlier stage if you go in regularly.

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  3. well said - it is amazing to mom when she does applications for the rescue how many people neglect annual care for their cats.

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    1. I guess I learned about yearly visits from my parents - or the vet that just told them to bring Kitty in once a year. When we had Kitty, we just kind of trusted the vet and let her do whatever (which is how Kitty got declawed - which I'm still not over).

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  4. Excellent post. I usually do see more dogs than cats when we go. This year we've probably gone at least seven times between the two of them. In January they both have to go again.

    I'd say these days insurance is a necessity. That will only end up driving up the cost of care though. As someone who has worked at vets, I do have a list of things I won't put mine through. As much as I love mine, animals simply can't understand what's going on, and I'm not a believer in sustaining life at all costs. We fear death; they don't, only fear suffering.

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    1. That is true. I never thought about it that way. I always feel so responsible for giving up on Kitty ... but you're right ... I didn't want her to suffer anymore as much as I wanted her to live.

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  5. Great post! In summary I think it has to do with perceptions about cats. We may think cats rule the internet and they have become popular over the decades, but cats are still seen as "second class" citizens when talking about companion animals. I see it everyday, some families think only their dog belongs inside while the cat gets let out.

    In addition, another phenomenon has been taking place, more people are adopting cats these days who are not allowed dogs in their condos, and many are newbie cat owners who may have been lead to believe that cats are "easy to care for" and less responsibility than a dog. Many think a cat is self sufficient and will get over the illness or whatever symptoms they may be manifesting. They only end up taking their cat to the vet when the illness has progressed too far :(

    So posts like yours highlighting the fact that they need veterinary care cannot be shared enough!

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    1. That's interesting because apartment complexes around here are MUCH friendlier to dogs than cats. They charge a non-refundable deposit of HUNDREDS of dollars, additional pet rent - and some require cats be declawed. I'm so thankful I found an economical option for us.

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  6. This post has provoked many thoughts in my head. When we first adopted Chuck and Angel, I took them to a general veterinarian, who tried to sell me on spay & neuter AND declaw! Thank God I stood my ground at that time. Later, I switched to a cats-only veterinary, and I really liked the place, until Chuck got sick and that vet didn't do echocardiograms. Then, our cat vet got really pissy, because I was taking Chuck to another vet...but she couldn't work with him! So, I've been looking for a new vet, and thought I'd found a great one. He saw Angel, Manny and CB a year ago. Then, I took Angel in a month or so ago, and he totally missed the point of why I brought her in. They wrote down 'urinary problems' and he took it to be peeing outside of the box. No, I said she's urinating more than ever before, but he didn't find any problems...but he didn't do a complete elder blood panel either! So, I'm out close to $200, and we don't know anything. I would prefer to see a vet that refuses to DECLAW, however I cannot find ANY cat-only vets in all of Metro-Detroit, and the nearest general veterinarian that doesn't declaw is on the other side of Detroit. Truly, I'm stymied.

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    1. I still go to the vet my parents chose for our rabbit when I was in middle school. We adopted Kitty a few years later and the vet asked if we wanted her to be declawed at the same time as she was spayed. We didn't know any better. I still feel so bad for that. That's why it's so important for me to educate other people.

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  7. This is a very informative post. I have to agree with you that I saw more dogs than cats at our vets. They have 2 waiting room areas, one for cats and one for dogs, but very often the over spill from the dogs encroached on the cat only area. It was appointment system unless it was an emergency and usually there would be a couple of other cats, but 4 or 5 dogs.

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    1. At first, I thought it was just my vet ... I wish people got the message!

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  8. Sadly, I think too many pet pawrents only take their pets (be they cats or dogs) in when there's something visibly wrong. And cats in particular are very independent and may not show signs of illness. Fascinating post. Well done. Your two kitties are lucky you're such a diligent cat-mommy. 😻 Kudos.

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  9. Fantastic post! I see the same thing here - many more dogs at the vet each time I'm there. It's sad that so many people don't think their cats need regular medical care. Just more of them being regarded as "disposable" pets, unfortunately.

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  10. Life with pets is a living and learning process, and I do things a lot differently now than I did many years ago. It may be the same for new pet families now, though I think there is so much more access to information than there used to be.
    A lot of factors come into play for me when deciding how often to take them to the vet...but whether they are a cat or dog is definitely not one of them. Sam actually goes to the vet far more often then Luke does, because she's elderly, she has health issues, and she tolerates it better. But we've passed on extensive tests and vaccines for her as well, if we didn't think it was in her best interest; whether our vet recommended it or not. Not everyone takes the time to be well informed on issues, I think it's definitely a benefit we get being pet bloggers - we learn so much more. So it is great of you to share this information with others!
    Jan, Wag 'n Woof Pets

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    1. I've learned so much from other bloggers that I wouldn't have any other way of knowing! Like the guinea hens could be so much fun.

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  11. Unfortunately, I know this to be true even with a few friends of mine who should know better. Rosie and Ruby are pretty even on their vet visits. In fact, they both had dentals this year. Ruby went first and then Rosie a few months later. I did have a cat named Elsie who passed away in 2016. She was deaf and feral and taking her to the vet was torture. They had to sedate her to even get near her. I admit there were a few years where I just couldn't handle taking her - it was so traumatic for all of us. Fortunately, the last few years of her life I found a vet who made house calls. He would come to our house and we would tackle her (not really but almost) in the bathroom.

    But you know who went to the vet more than anyone - our rabbit Lulu. She had to go in almost every month because she all kinds of health issues. LOL.

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    1. Our family's first pet was a rabbit and we didn't take him to the vet until something was very very wrong. And that only happened because I begged my parents and called around to find the most economical vet. I couldn't just let him suffer like that and it makes me so sad that my parents could.

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  12. For as often as we go to the vet, we are well above the average!

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    1. It happens! Our visits have increased exponentially since we adopted Ellie.

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  13. AMARULA: Bear I say the fewer times to the vet the better -- but I love any post with lots of photos of you!!

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  14. All so very true and, so well written. I am quite hot on diet now, myself, especially as Mrs H has so many of them, and aware that certainly re. obesity there is as much blame to lay with feed manufacturers as owners. It is however so hard to sustain interest with indoor only cats, to generate the exercise and weight reduction that food alone can not manage. I also wonder therefore how many other illness/issues can be linked back to both feed and exercise?
    Purrs
    ERin

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    1. Good point. Ellie especially is way over-weight - but with free feeding it's kind of hard to figure out what to do.

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  15. Grr-eat post, Momma Kat! Mom makes sure I get to the vet at least 2 times a year, but usually its more often than that, 'cause I have Polly's Sis Tics Kid Knee Zzz's (whoever and whatever that is!). When Mom and Dad adopted me, I also had Ginger's Vite Us (or something like that), so since then I've gotten my teeth cleaned purr-fessionally twice a year which has helped make my gums feel better. Tee hee hee. Winks.

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  16. You know, this is a save for new cat parents. I wish it was printed and posted and put in Vet offices. It should be printed and in all adoption centers too. Excellent , good information.
    I have been down the horrible road of "betraying" my girl...Admiral, when she was so sick. She had such anguished howls the whole time that I cried hard so I could hardly see to drive. When I got there, I had to sit in the parking lot till I could compose myself. I had to take her once a week and it was horrible. She was so sick. The vet techs were high schoolers on a volunteer basis, tho it was a large practice and they didn't have any training on how to handle cats. And the scruffed my baby hard. I finally took to watching thru the glass window. When they saw me they quit. I left that practice. There are no cat centric practices around at all. We are thrust in
    with dogs who bark, and come up tfrightening the cats, tho the dogs of course look at it differently. Things like bad treatment at the Vet and the cat's terror at the personnel tend to cause loving people to dread taking their cats in. I do it anyway. Finally got them to stop scruffing.

    I

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    1. Please delete if this is too strong. I will easily understand.

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    2. I'm so sorry you went through that with your precious Admiral. A trustworthy vet and vet practice is worth its weight in gold.

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    3. No apologies. We have to tell these stories to educate people. My heart breaks for both of you.

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  17. I've taken Annie to the vet so many times this year, and looking back, I don't think it's helped much. Her vet's office called me yesterday stating that the doctor wanted to do a recheck exam and another CBC. I went ahead and made the appointment and then my husband pointed out that I'll pay $200 or so and to what end. I canceled the appointment. When I asked why the doctor wanted to reexamine her, she said it's because Annie stopped taking some pain medication (at the vet's request). That is definitely not a reason for an exam and more blood work (she's had multiple blood tests this year too). I'll bring her in a few months. She just saw a very expensive neurologist for a thorough exam and x-ray. Sorry for rambling. This was a great, and for me, timely, post. I absolutely loved seeing the pictures of Bear and Ellie together.

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    1. No rambling at all! Well, except for in my post ;)
      Our vet doesn't call to remind us of anything ... kind of makes me nervous sometimes. You know the right thing to do for her and you.

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  18. Great post! I discovered your blog and Ellie & Bear look like 2 cool cats :) I also take my cat to the vet about once a year for general checkup and he is about your Ellie's age. Look forward to your next post!

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  19. Thank you for an informative article Momma BearKat! (I saw the link to your post on FB thru ERin the Princess cat so thought I'd stop by. I totally agree about dogs going to Vet's more than cats.
    I am an exception to the rule....when my Bluepoint Birman/Siamese Nylablue was alive & developed IBD we went for weekly Vet appointments. In 18 months it cost $3,000. to keep her stable until her passing. (I hade 4 devoted bloggers & 2 RWB readers who helped with costs). Then with Siddhartha Henry I spent anywhere from $150.-$220. a month on food, meds & supplies plus 2 visits to Vet per year. I know people where I am think me mad for spending 'so much money on just a cat'...they do on their dogs but not their felines. Truly sad isn't it??
    Thank you again for the great article.
    Sincerely Sherri-Ellen aka LadyMew/LadyMum

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    1. Yep. Back when Bear had his sarcoma scare, several people told me they hoped I wouldn't waste my money on him. EXCUSE ME?!?! No such thing. You knew what they needed and you did it!

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  20. What a great post. I’m very thankful that we have a fantastic cat only vet within a mile of our house. This past year, I felt like we were there at least monthly! We obviously take our dog to a different vet. And you’re right, it’s usually dogs that we see in the waiting room. I’ve seen cats a few times, but not as often. Hopefully articles like yours will help cat owners see why they need to go regularly to the vet!

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    1. Thank you! It's so important ... no matter how little we like taking them!

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  21. WONDERFUL post, Momma Kat! Thank you for calling attention to the importance of regular veterinary visits for cats. We are pretty fanatical about taking our kitties to the vet. Yes, Gracie and Ava (especially Gracie) sing the song of their people all the way there, but it is worth it to make sure they are doing well.

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    1. That is true. And I would never forgive myself if my cats were in pain and I could've done something to prevent the pain altogether or make it better.

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